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SonoMania – “Voyage” Interview

The beginning of winter brings not only cold weather and running noses, but also a boost in the Bucharest contemporary music stage, with the start of the MERIDIAN International Festival (read the whole program HERE). During the festival, SonoMania new music ensemble will perform, on December 4th 2013, VOYAGE, a concert with works by the young generation of Romanian composers, realized in partnership with CIMRO. On this occasion we’ve invited the young artists that participate in the concert to answer some questions about the contemporary academic music world and what they expect or take from it. Without further ado, here are their answers.

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Some of you are still students, some are already established artists, nationally and internationally. What has determined you to start working in the new music field and what is it that keeps you going?

Gabriel Mălăncioiu (composer): Meeting Remus Georgescu and hearing a concert of contemporary music played by Trio Contraste were very important factors for my musical development.

Diana Rotaru (composer): I was very skeptical at first of this “contemporary music”, I didn’t listen to it until I was 15 or 16 years old. My mother, being a composer, had a lot of recordings, and so I gradually started to explore this new domain, starting with her works. And when I was hooked, I was hooked for good. At some point I listened to a CD of this Swedish ensemble, peärls before swïne experience, and I was surprised to see that, in its essence, no matter what the general audience may think, new music is mostlyFUN. Fun to write, fun to play and fun to hear. Even when it’s tough or deep or visceral or hallucinatory, once it grabs you it never lets you go. And this is why I’ll keep doing this, no matter the difficulties.

Raluca Stratulat (violinist): I first discovered what contemporary music feels like after I graduated. What made me want to do it seriously was the idea that haunted me for some time, that is that people often misunderstand contemporary music, and that the fault for that may very well be the performer’s (being one myself). Nobody forces you to accept to play something, and if you accepted to play it, then it’s only in your nature as a performer to search the perfect way to express it and to reach to as many people as possible. What keeps me going is the constant novelty of this kind of music, and the wish to continuously be a complete musician. The means of expression contained in this area of music (which is almost impossible to describe in words because of it’s immense mixture of genres) helped me improve my violin technique, my acting skills, it significantly widened my artistic horizon, made me want to always discover for new things, and finally, this music is an important part of what I mean today as a musician. 

Octavian Moldovean (flutist): Music has a lot to offer, as much as it has a broad spectrum of possibilities. As artists, we are built to seek diversity more than regular people do. In addition, a complete artist should have a performance repertory as wide as possible. In this way, new music proves to be both a challenge and a curiosity switch. I find contemporary music to be useful and interesting. It attracts me because of its complexity – thanks to all the miscellaneous effects and dynamics it develops instrumental technique. (For instance, after playing Ferneyhough or Takemitsu, any other classical piece feels like a walk in the park). Thus, I believe it is a matter of keeping an opened mind and broaden our perspectives with every experience that music has to offer. 

Sabina Ulubeanu (composer): I was attracted to new music since elementary school. The piano competitions included a mandatory Romanian new work which I loved and was eager to play every single time. When I was 8 years old, I was assigned a  piece by a living composer who came into the class and gave me indications and advice. It was a fascinating experience for me and it made me love the new music even more. Of course, now everything I played back then sounds so „normal” and even mainstream, but in those times when the repertoire was mainly baroque, classical and romantic, it was  a very welcomed variation. Later I decided to try to compose my self and it became addictive. I realised the new music and the new sounds are a necessity for me, I just have to let out every wave that haunts me. 

Eugen Bogdan Popa (cellist): Although it was not an exclusive choice regarding that music, my motivation has been, since the beginning, the sincere interest for the contemporary language and for the performing means it develops. My activity in that regard started about 10 years ago, when I received the honouring invitation from composer Dan Dediu to be a member in the PROFIL ensemble. The approach I made ever since to the new music also influenced my Ph.D. research, and being part in other newer ensembles, such as PROPULS and SONOMANIA keeps offering me possibilities to express as a musician in a field of ever growing interest, so I let myself be challenged and inspired! 

Maria Chifu (bassoonist): I felt a real need to grow, and new music offered me that unique joy of experimenting and surpassing my own limits, of being one step beyond of what had been created so far.

Sebastian Androne (composer): Stravinsky’s „Rite of Spring” was the trigger in my case. I’ve listened to it in highschool with my jaw on the floor, hardly believing that a piece of music can have such a humongous expressive force. Later, while I was still grasping the idea that the XXth century music merely expands the expressive pallet of the universal music, drilling into unexploited fields, I’ve come across another composition that blew my mind: Penderecki’s „De Natura Sonoris”. Gradually I realized that through art objects (a painting, a novel or a symphony for example), one can manifest his/her own view and attitude of his/her time. Why should I choose the unchangeable past when I can try to understand my own present and add my contribution to the future? 

Ana Giurgiu-Bondue (composer): I am a composer but also a pianist and a harpsichordist. As an interpret, I play very different musics, from baroque to contemporary. So, my interests in music are many and varied. I started to compose very early, even before knowing the musical notes, when I was around 5 years old but I decided quite late to be a composer. Nevertheless, composition is now for me a necessity, a permanent need to create and re-create my reality.

Gabriel Mălăncioiu ©  Stefan Firca

Diana Rotaru © Stefan Firca

Do you think that contemporary music in Romania benefited from a perceptible interest growth in the past few years, or do you think it remained mostly the same as it was after 1989? 

Gabriel: I can see some good signs in the later years: the composition workshop during George Enescu Festival is a very useful idea, helping young composers to get in touch with internationally recognized composers, the appearance of New Music Festivals like InnerSound is certainly giving a fresh look to our contemporary musical scene; another good sign is the emergence of ensembles dedicated to playing contemporary music in various cities: Sonomania Ensemble in Bucureşti, Ad-Hoc Ensemble in Cluj, Atem Ensemble in Timişoara to name just a few. 

Diana: I definitely think there are some changes, especially in the independent field. A lot of new people involved, a lot of events and a growing public for experimental music. This did not happen when I was a student. Still, we have a long way to go until we reach the level of other European centers, even the small ones, and our improvement should start with more funding and more respect for new music artists, especially the younger ones. 

Raluca: Yes, I think things have considerably changed since 1989, but I always believed that the more we musicians gain interest in it, the more the rest of the people will. So if we really want to gain more public, then we have to become truly in love with the new music ourselves first. 

Octavian: Hard to compare, since I came to exist precisely in ’89. However, I can say that compared to a few years ago, Romanian new music has grown. A reason for this growth is the solid tradition of several modern age composers such as Anatol Vieru, Aurel Stroe, Sigismund Toduta, Theodor Rogalsky, Constantin Silvestri and many more others. These people left a valuable heritage of works, establishing an inspired perspective for the living composers today. For example, Doina Rotaru is appreciated all over the world for her compositions. I had the privilege to work with Mario Caroli, one of the leader instrumentalists in new music, who is constantly playing Mrs. Rotaru’s creations. Henceforth, I find that young composers should become aware of our native predecessors and maintain a national tradition as much as they learn to express themselves. 

Sabina: Immediately after 1989…no, the interest did not raise.  But in the last few years it did. My explanation is simple: the involvement of new media, such as video, photography, contemporary dance  and electronics, attracts a new kind of public,  people that perceive art as a whole and develop a taste for new music with the help of visuals. And they don’t come only to syncretic shows, but begin to fill the concert halls even when only music is present. 

Maria: It surely did. I notice this each year in the increasing number of people in the concert halls and in the unconventional spaces, in the appearance of new festivals – which was absolutely necessary -, in the growing interest of composers and performers from abroad and in their reaction towards Romanian contemporary musical creation. Anyway, if one desires a boost of this impact, I think it’s necessary to have a more intense creative input, as well as a much better distribution towards the potential receptive audience. 

Ana: I think it is a huge difference between these two periods, the situation exactly after ’89 and nowadays times. The new generation of Romanian musicians is extremely concerned to discover new art forms and to conquer, at the same time, a new public. I think a very important aspect in promoting new music is establishing a really interactive dialogue, work and experimentation between musicians and other arts and artists, even scientists, as well as a better communication between different generations. When I helped Adina Dumitrescu and Catalin Cretu to create Opus in 1998, this was our goal. I was very happy to find some of these ideas embodied into another form, the InnerSound Festival. I think that, at the moment, the idea of Team work is vital for the future. Nobody works in science nowadays on their own, but in a team. But this implies patience and giving up one’s personal pride and rigid conceptions.

Raluca Stratulat © Mihai Cucu

Octavian Moldovean

Do you think chamber music still has a place in the new music field, or did it became anachronistic in comparison with all the new technologies? 

Gabriel: Yes, I think chamber music is the first choice for many composers. I don’t think chamber music will ever became anachronistic in comparison with new technologies, but, certainly, it can be enhanced by the electronic medium. 

Diana: I think it does. There is still that irreplaceable quality of a human being touching a string or a flute that I doubt will go out of fashion. Working with multimedia or electronic devices is fascinating and opens whole new worlds, but I don’t think that these means of expression should exclude the “traditional” ones. 

Raluca: I like to believe that chamber music will never seize to exist regardless of the age we live in, and I also believe that all the new technologies that are used today can only help it to evolve or if you like help it transcend it’s status. Chamber music is my first love, and I think it is an important part of every musician’s life, one that cannot be dispersed without the risk of losing one’s identity. Chamber music is not only a superior way of communication among musicians, but because more than one of them play together, it also becomes a communion, a reflection of one’s self in the others and vice versa, and not lastly a supreme being in which one seize to exist as an individual, to become part of something greater. So yes, I think we will always feel the need of chamber music, because it’s a part of our human nature translated into music. 

Octavian: Regardless of how much technology would develop, people will still need the energy that flows in the concert hall during a performance. It is a chemistry between the transmitter and receiver, bounding that a machine or computer could never make. Solo playing can become boring, and orchestra requires a lot of organizing and it usually is expensive. Chamber music has a greater chance to thrive because it offers a more intimate approach to the music. It has the advantage of being more accessible for composers and the audience. Moreover, chamber music enhances solo performing and dialogue better than orchestra playing does. 

Sabina: Chamber music will never die. Even the new technologies are made by people! and these people play together: a composition for 2 computers is still chamber music. Chamber music means interaction, attention, empathy and a whole range of feelings. Also, the public and the players need variation. We need to hear classical music, contemporary music, made with a few instruments, made by a  big symphonic orchestra or  electronics. So I am positive that chamber music cannot be anachronistic. 

Eugen Bogdan: Chamber music will always exist in any type of new music. I strongly believe that the dialogue, as a valuable principle, will always be a key to understanding music, regardless of the specific era in which music was created. The topic is extremely debatable, but regarding the impact on new technologies, I don’t think it creates a situation of exclusion or marginalization of chamber music, but quite the opposite, it enhances it.

Maria: I am certain of it. For me, contemporary music is the sum of the multiple states a human being can feel, if the composer manages to convey their message to the audience. I think in that case, any means of communicating ideas, immages, emotions – that everybody needs – is useful.

Sebastian: I believe that technological innovation expands certain elements of what it can later replace. But I am convinced that chamber music will not disappear due to some technologically improved replicas. The tradition of an instrument for example cannot just be erased from the collective memory and be replaced by a substitute. 

Ana: Chamber music is like a pyramidal basis in our European musical tradition. So it is impossible to consider it “anachronistic”. New technologies bring other resources,  an enormous variety of sounds, effects and creates a new possibility, a new perspective for different arts to collaborate.

Sabina Ulubeanu © Cornel Brad

Eugen-Bogdan Popa © Florin Artist

The “avant-garde” concept seems to have scared the music lovers in the past century, although this didn’t happen with the other arts. Can we still speak of avant-garde in today’s music or not? 

Gabriel: I think in the present time it’ s more a question of synthesizing the discoveries made in the last centuries. And more than that, I think that each composer tries to find his own way by going more deeply into his own psyche and then using methods, systems, sonorities, structures… that resonate with those inner discoveries, than just finding himself in an endless search of something REALLY NEW. In the same time, the  avant-garde has the role of destroying the borders created by tradition; and these two opposite  forces paradoxically coexists, even in our times.

Diana: Not really. I think we have reached the point when we don’t have to reject the past or the non-academic music, we can embrace them and try to create something sincere and original by combining all sorts of influences. That doesn’t mean that I promote kitsch or facile music, far from it. I am puzzled by young composers that are writing as if they lived at the beginning of the XXth century, or worse. I see absolutely no use in trying to copy the past; one should learn it, yes, assimilate it and tranform it into something else, something personal – and by “past” I mean the whole XXth century, with all its currents and developments, as well! 

Raluca: My opinion is that the spirit of avant-garde is proper to the art itself, whose only constant is change, the continuously hunger for novelty and finding new means of expression. It depends of what we understand through the concept of avant-garde. If we see it as a reaction to something old that is already consumed and in a dead end, I’m sure there will always be people to think that, along with people who miss the old ways, like there always have been, and not just regarding music, but other arts too and even life itself. Also, the range of today’s music is so wide that I believe we cannot speak of anything absent. Something new happens every day, only thing is that everyone sees it as they can or like, and it’s not labeled as it used to be in the past. There are too many genres to be analysed and labeled, and as many as they are, the shorter their life seems to be. One of today’s feature is that one can constantly prove itself, which didn’t seem so happen so much in the past, perhaps because of our increase hunger to consume, to live more, to experience as much as possible. And if the avant-garde concept seize to exist in today’s music, then it means we have to remove it from our vocabulary too. Therefore I think that as long as we still use it, it exist, but maybe it’s signification has changed, or gained new meanings. 

Octavian: Avant-garde can be spoken of anytime during history; and thanks to that, we’re not in the cave right now, or hunting animals with our bare hands. There have always been people that simply did not settle for the rules and regulations imposed by others within a certain time. It’s quite the same in music too: some composers strive to find uniqueness in every aspect of their creation – and they succeed. Nevertheless, there is the danger of overdoing the avant-garde: in the hazardous attempt to be original, other music creators write a lot of meaningless repertory. And that is scary, for everyone. 

Sabina: The beauty of our times is that we can choose from a multitude of facets in new music. Feeling nostalgic? Listen to Doina Rotaru. Computer virtuosity and beautiful energy? Have some Henry Vega. Want to reflect on the meaning of life? Octavian Nemescu is your guy. Do you need to develop and search your innerself in a beethovenian way? It’s time for Tiberiu Olah. So, there is time and space for everyone who has the talent to transform you and your feelings. I don’t know if it’s avant-garde or not, but I am happy with the current state of music. 

Maria: Art, as well as science, in normal conditions, develops under the light of evolution, everything progressing along with our civilization. Within the audience there are always controversies, the history has continuously known these forms of reaction, while being witness to progress. One cannot create works that bring nothing innovative, only from fear of failure or to please the audience. I have met people who were reticent towards new music, but those same people, after a while, started to understand the message of the composer and are currently coming to syncretic concerts and shows with pleasure and interest. 

Sebastian: Probably the avant-garde has had this effect on humans since always in all arts. Novelty is obsession to some and kryptonite to others. Of course we can speak of avant-garde in today’s music. There are experiments in each new music festival. Although this fact does not guarantee masterpieces it still has the potential of opening new artistic directions. 

Ana: No, I really think the concept of avant-garde is not available anymore. The Avant-garde is supposed to precede something. We cannot forget that the “avant-garde” period in 20th century had also huge political and economical aspects and enormous artistic constraints. I think now is the time for a new “Renaissance”, a new Freedom and Responsibility for the artistic (musical) gesture. Responsibility? Yes, for the creators; because art is supposed to form the sensibility. We cannot ignore the human emotional function and just address “interesting concepts and ideas” to the intellect.

Maria Chifu © Alma Ghiulea

Sebastian Androne

Ana Giurgiu-Bondue

One last question, for composers only: tell us two words about your work and how it integrates with your own artistic search and aspirations. 

Gabriel: Into this work “Linişte” , I’m using Lucian Blaga’s poem, which creates a connection with an archaic musical culture that is fascinating me in this moment.

Diana: My work is called “Play!”, a polysemantic word that means “to play a musical instrument”, “to play a role”, “theatrical performance” as well as “to play a game”. It synthesizes my musical preoccupations, as it deals with narrative elements (contrast, musical characters, development) as well as trance-like, contemplative ones. I’ve used some little theatrical elements, like the “theatre” gong that the pianist has to play, as well as a quite strict modal language and rhythms based on the Fibonacci series. Mostly though I just had fun writing it. 

Sabina: Raum und Liebe is a composition that explores my melodic world, a distinctive pattern in my creation, but also my less used harmonic interior, which I felt the need to „exercise”. Space-Time and Memory , my whole life obsessions, are the  two investigated concepts behind this music. Memory relies on affects, on feelings and on associations. Memory is therefore Love, that creates Time, Space and Presence. From the musical point of view,  Space is expressed transformative and evolutional, in its interlaced harmonic and melodic states. The harmonic paradigm becomes obsession,  ostinato,  while  melody travels from heterophony to polyphony, only to unveil the serenity of monody at the very end. I have deliberately worked  with harmony  and ostinatos and also with a more rythmical and energetic side of myself, and I have enjoyed that a lot.

Sebastian: „Le Voyage de l’Age Voy” is directly linked to Anouar Sarhan’s concert and the piece was composed to be performed in the opening of his concert. I wanted to compose a piece that would contrast his music but would still share some idiomatic traits. I was interested in expanding the expressive palette and I treated it like a real journey, a stylistic incursion into distinct and recognizable worlds of sound. One of my objectives was to create a homogenous discourse focusing on the transitions that were of great compositional interest to me.

Ana: My work “Le Feu” is written in 2012. I was very impressed by some poems belonging to a francophone poet and doctor from Haiti, Jean Metellus, poems about the 4 elements in Nature. My intention was to explore, in my musical way, the link between this metaphoric and mystical text, the voice, a melodic instrument (viola) and a harmonic instrument (piano). The form is inspired by an ancient profane cantata by Montéclair, a French composer in the 18th century. I am fascinated by the formal asymmetry in ancient and baroque music and my “narrative” approach in composition allows me to create links between some of these forms and my own musical ideas; of course, in a new context and in my personal musical language.

SonoMania’s “Voyage”

 

Music is a perpetual journey, from the composer’s colourful mind to the blankness of the page, where dreams are meticulously combed, clipped and fashioned until they become coherent form. Then it’s the performer’s turn to translate into living sound the hieroglyphics that had darkened the page, thus creating both in time and space a sound architecture. The audience is now provoked to assimilate the message in its own mental universe. This fragile act of communication repeats itself for each piece from the concert – which thus becomes a journey between musics. You are provoked to such a sound travel Wednesday, December 4th, 5 p.m., at the “Cantacuzino” Palace in Bucharest (Calea Victoriei 141). There you’ll meet SonoMania New Music Ensemble and its conductor for the evening, Alexandru Solonaru, who have chosen to focus on the new generations of Romanian composers. Each of them is different, yet each of them is connected to an undefinable yet typical Romanian expressiveness, enriched by the use of contemporary music techniques.

The concert is included in the MERIDIAN International Contemporary Music Festival, organized by the ISCM Romanian Section (director: Ulpiu Vlad). “Voyage” is supported by CIMRO and, as such, we’ll keep you updated on this event, also including on our website a short interview with the musicians involved in the concert.

PROGRAM:

Alexandru Sima – “Suite cambrienne” (2013) for oboe, bassoon, viola, cello, piano and percussion
Mihai Măniceanu – “Cadenza” (2007) for cello and piano
Ana Giurgiu-Bondue – “Le Feu” (2012) for soprano, viola and piano
Diana Rotaru – “Play!” (2007) for flute and piano
Sebastian Androne – “Le Voyage de l’Age Voy” (2010) for flute, cello and piano
Gabriel Mălăncioiu – “Linişte” (2012) for soprano and flute
Sabina Ulubeanu – “Raum und Liebe” (2012) for flute, viola, cello and piano
Vlad Maistorovici – “Khadina” (2005) for soprano, flute, english horn, violin, viola, cello, piano, harpsichord and guitar

The works:

Alexandru Sima, the youngest of the group (b.1990) uses a wide range of expressions in his “Suite cambrienne”: from darkness to light, from heterophonic weeping to percussion dance, from archaic incantations to jazz, all combined in a sort of ritual from the beginnings of the world.

An appreciated talent both as a composer and as a pianist, Mihai Măniceanu (b.1976) plays with the ironic and absurd in “Cadenza”, using the „à la manière de…” technique. Made entirely of classical and romantic cadenza-clichés, the work is a continuous cavalcade of communication errors between the cello and the piano.

Another double-career musician, composer and pianist Ana Giurgiu-Bondue (b.1977) was inspired by the form of the small, 18th century French secular cantatas for one voice. In “Le Feu”, the composer  illustrates a poem by Jean Métellus. The expressive melodic development can be described as “post-enescian”.

In “Play!”, Diana Rotaru (b.1981) takes advantage of the different meanings of the word in English (to play a instrument, to play a game, to play a role, theatrical performance) to create a quasi-theatrical dialogue between the flute and the piano, that chase each other, entwining their sonorities in a dreamlike time.

Sebastian Androne (b.1989) wrote “Le Voyage de L’Age Voy” at the initiative of the “Princess Margaret of Romania Foundation” to be performed in the opening of Anouar Brahem’s concert in 2011. Androne created a homogenous stylistic travel by using recognizable music material in a non-elitist discourse which is made with his usual talent and sincerity.

Gabriel Mălăncioiu (b.1979) wrote “Linişte” (“Quiet”) on the anniversary of his composition teacher, Remus Georgescu. The soprano and the flute weave a delicate and transparent texture on Lucian Blaga’s gorgeous poem.

Composer and photographer Sabina Ulubeanu (b.1979) says about “Raum und Liebe”: “We become aware of ourselves and the outside world through our senses. The feeling is the one that created the notion of interior space, close-far being thus the quantitative expression of love. We fill the distance between us and the others with love, and love is movement, travel towards the other, the space-time in which we all exist, individually and together.”

Last but not least, the violin and composition virtuoso Vlad Maistorovici (b.1985) explores in his sensual “Khadina” the dark forces of feminity, as these misterious entertainers (dancers and sometimes prostitutes) were known for using dark magic. The initial interwoven multiple lamento gradually transforms into a frenetic dance that leads to a final and desperate explosion.

The performers: 

SonoMania is a new music ensemble created in 2012 at the initiative of composer Diana Rotaru, its artistic director. The ensemble gathers some of the best young new music performers in Romania and is fully dedicated to promoting the music of today, as well as significant works from the 20th century. While recently formed, SonoMania has already participated in important festivals in Bucharest (The International New Music Week – SIMN, Bucharest Music Film Festival, MERIDIAN) as well as the “Happoman” Festival in South Korea.

Alexandru Solonaru is the only conductor in his generation that has dedicated himself exclusively to the contemporary music phenomenon. His artistic and managerial talent was made obvious by a series of events such as: portrait-concerts dedicated to Romanian key names such as Aurel Stroe, Ştefan Niculescu or Tiberiu Olah; alternative and multimedia events; the Romanian premiers of works by Steve Reich, Kevin Volans, Mauricio Kagel and Karlheinz Stockhausen; first performances of young Romanian composers.

Performers on December 4th: Veronica Anuşca (soprano), Octavian Moldovean (flute), Valentin Ghita (oboe, english horn), Maria Chifu (bassoon), Tamara Dica (viola), Eugen-Bogdan Popa (cello), Olga Podobinschi (piano), Diana Rotaru (piano), Sorin Rotaru (percussion), Radu Vâlcu (guitar). Guests: Raluca Stratulat (violin), Mihai Maniceanu (piano) and Andreea Butnaru (piano).

Free entrance.

The poster is created by visual artist Mihai Cucu. 

MEDIA PARTNERS: Metropotam, Contemporania

Ana Giurgiu-Bondue

Ana Giurgiu-Bondue is a Romanian – French composer, pianist, and harpsichordist whose interests encompass multiple aspects of composition and performance. She received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in composition and piano from the National University of Music in Bucharest, Romania in 2001 and 2002. She carried out research on myth in music and in Enescu’s Œdipe opera at the Sorbonne Paris IV University where she obtained a Master Research’s degree in 2007. In 2008, she received her Ph.D. in composition from the National University of Music in Bucharest with her thesis The Musical Syncretic Performance, which focused on the interplay of myth, drama, and esotericism in opera.

She has earned composition grants and scholarships in Romania, Germany, Italy, and the Czech Republic and has also been awarded in several piano performance and composition competitions in Romania, France, and Italy. Her work as a composer includes songs, chamber works, choral works, orchestral works, and three chamber operas. Her interests also extend to theatre and film music.

Since 2005, she has lived in France, where she works as a composer, pianist, and piano teacher. Over the last four years she has also studied the harpsichord and early music performance at Orsay Conservatory. She has composed for ancien instruments various works (Toccata for harpsichord, Concertino for harpsichord and baroque ensemble).

Since 2000, she has collaborated on some original programmes with mezzo-soprano Adriana Epstein, to whom she also dedicated several of her compositions (such as the cycle of songs Robaiates, The Fire for voice, viola, and piano). She collaborate regulary with the Romanian young cellist Laura Buruiana for modern and baroque music.

She is Artistic Co-Director of the contemporary music ensemble Une bouteille à la mer in Lille, France.

 

 

 

 

 

CAMP-festival in Cluj 2013

CAMP-Festival 2013 in Cluj, Romania 15 – 21 September 2013

International Festival for Visual Music

 

research and rehearsals 15 – 21 september |CASA MATEI andCASA TRANSIT

performances 20 / 21 September 9 pmCASA TRANZIT

symposium 19 septemberCASA MATEI

CAMP exhibition 18 – 21 septemberCASA MATEI

workshop 16 – 21 septemberCASA MATEI

 

Performances

audiovisual performances and concerts created and performed by theCAMPcollective featuring the participating artists.

20 and 21 september at9 pm

Workshop

“do it yourself” sound systems. The materials and geometry of ordinary objects will be used as an analog sound system amplifier. One can amplify sound from old and low power speakers using recycled install pipes and boxes, cans, paper tubes and cardboard boxes sealed with polyurethane foam. Materials proposed by the participants can also be included.

with: Justin Baroncea – architect, visuals artist, performer, Eduard Gabia – performer, musician

Symposiun CAMP-Festival 2013 Cluj

19 september 2013at10 am – 5 pmCasa Matei

“We’re in this Together Now”

A Symposium on Crossmedial Experiments in the Collaborative Arts

The symposium is dedicated to the recently much discussed theme of collaboration in the arts and related fields, with a focus on the performative arts. Particularly in avant-garde or neo-avantgarde experimental projects, collaborative approaches are often deployed as a means to transcend the myth of the solitairy genius artist, but also to bring together various media and technologies in open, laboratory-style environments – for instance in the visual music scene in which theCAMPfestival has been situated since 1999. In the context of this symposium, “collaborative arts” does not simply refer to projects in which several participants are involved, but to those which encourage genuine exchange, interaction, amalgamation and hybridization. The speakers will present and discuss case studies from their respective fields of research and/or practical experience, and contextualize them against the background of contemporary and historic discourses on experimentation, collaboration and performativity. Moreover, a question to be addressed is to which extent the latest rise of collaborative art projects mirrors the postindustrial, digital-based era which increasingly looks for new modes of production and consumption such as “prosumerism” or “wikinomics”.

With: Cornelia Lund, Miron Ghiu, Horea Avram, Jörg Scheller, Mircea Florian

Concept

TheCAMPFestivalwas founded in 1999 by Prof. Fried Dähn and Thomas Maos. Since 2003, it has been organized and run and coordinated byCAMPe.V. (Thomas Maos, Fried Dähn, Stefan Hartmaier, and Martin Mangold) .

The international CAMP(Creative Arts and Music Project) festival is an innovative platform and interactive research lab for sound artists, musicians, and artists in the areas of video, installation, projection and new media. It focuses on new, experimental music in conjunction with light, projection and media art. In what is effectively a laboratory created for a defined period, artists – all of them recognized members of the international avantgarde in their respective fields – collaborate for several days on new forms of audio-visual art, presentation techniques and live performances. The results are showcased to the public in concerts, installations, and performances held alongside the event. Moreover, various topics and aspects are presented and developed in accompanying lectures and workshops.

Each festival is staged at a different location, with a new team of international artists. The unfamiliar spaces, the associated creative criteria, and collaboration with new artists pose challenges that unlock vast creative potential and foster intensive international dialogue. GOAL The development of new forms of artistic presentation in sound and light art, in the context of contemporary and forward-looking creative approaches. International dialogue and collaboration between artists from different backgrounds, with a catalytic effect at both a personal and cultural level.

Read more HERE.

 

Jazz & More 2013

Jazz &More International Festival – the 9th Edition

Sibiu, October 4/5/6 2013

Organiser: INTERZONE Cultural Association

During October 4-6, Sibiu will host yet again the International Improvised Music Festival Jazz & More. This 9th edition of the festival will take place at the Gong Theater, the „St. John“ evangelic church and Atrium Cafe. The director, Mircea Streit, proposes a 100% non-commercial festival, dedicated to a creative audience interested in improvised and new music, one that always asks itself questions regarding the evolution and the developing of music. Jazz & More is a unique experience in Romania, a different kind of festival.

Hosting 17 concerts in only 3 days time, this musical marathon will present jazz, chamber music as well as improvised music. Romanian artists such as Mircea Tiberian, Stylipsticks or String Trio will performs alongside foreign guests in common projects: The Convergence Quartet (Taylor Ho Bynum, Harris Eisenstadt, USA and Alexander Hawkins, Dominic Lash, England); saxophonist’s Sabir Mateen trio as well as Scott Fields (guitar) and his group, Freetet (USA); from Denmark, Lotte Anker (saxophone) and the Angel trio; Eve Risser, Jean-Luc Guionnet, Edward Perraud and Benjamin Duboc (France); Erase trio (Poland); Elisabeth Harnik (piano, Austria) and many more.

Find the complete program and how to buy tickets HERE, on the festival’s official website. 

The festival is sponsored by Sibiu City Hall and the Local Council of Sibiu – through the Cultural House of Sibiu.

Partners: the Polish Cultural Institute in Bucharest, the Austrian Cultural Forum Bucharest and the Danish Jazz Federation.

FALSE FESTIVAL 2013

FALSE FESTIVAL 2013 @CNDB, September 15-17

 

 

 

Sâmbăta Sonoră invokes the concept of false / resistance to false: having never intended to organize a music festival, we now have to fake it.

“Magic exists” – thus announces the yearly recurring and largest music festival in RO happening now and dedicated to the memory of composer &c George Enescu – and needs a wand and top hat. It is useful and grossly lacks contemporary sense. This makes us want to demonstrate without falling into repertory that there must be yet another ear inside the ear. Capable of perceiving also non-academic, experimental music. It feels like work and is a system of production and open network distribution and this is where we stand. Quantitative and qualitative proofs via London-Bucarest-Tel Aviv will be presented instantly for a non-delirious musical space and time. Program below.

But is it legit? Even though unpopular &musical institutions are incapable of taking it seriously without patrimonialist/comercial &status arguments, this “non-academic experimental music”, fairly easy to recognize due to its lack of interest in harmony (magic, according to the new calendar), only breaks with the past in order to acknowledge a premise, the new &non-organisational sound. Nothing unheard of here &so-called False Festival isn’t made in ivory towers of corporate nostalgia &is more a superspecialized platform. We call upon this false festival music to do what it knows how to do best: sound problematic &in touch with other art forms of the present-real, be rare and accesible to all those who realise that it only sounds strange &already anachronistic if associated with a self-image &too familiar &too inspired from life, ultramodernist, more efficient, more dehumanized. If this is its postmodern condition &anything is possible musically, why even bother to define it negatively in relation to the magical kind, which always asks where is the absolute? &why doesn’t it keep that safe distance with tradition? Because this is the false perspective, and what’s further ahead must appear larger than what is at hand.

(re)Capitulating: the phenomenon to be perceived is so sensible that it appears false. No graduated link with the past will make it seem any more real. Its specificity is activist. It poses problems and offers no solutions for a festival we can’t afford and have no way out of.

It has: international activists and local exponents, sounds capable of reaching deeper than the classics, possible links between musicians and organizers: Sâmbăta Sonoră and

Cafe OTO (UK)

Maybe the world’s busiest small performance space, Cafe OTO opened in London in April 2008 with the aim of providing a home for creative new music that exists outside of the mainstream, hosting an evening programme of adventurous live music almost seven nights a week. Hamish Dunbar, Cafe OTO programmer, presents Paul Abbott, a quietly innovative presence in London’s improvised music scene working with electronics and self-built instruments before more recently dedicating a good part of his energy to the radical potential of an unadorned drumset, notably as one third of lll人 with Seymour Wright and Daichi Yoshikawa. His practice focuses on the heuristic aspect of free improvisation – as a process of discovery, learning and dialogue. Paul has worked with musicians including Eddie Prévost, Otomo Yoshihide, Evan Parker, Seymour Wright, Toshimaru Nakamura, Sebastian Lexer, Guillaume Villtard, Daichi Yoshikawa and Benedict Drew.

Primate Arena (IL)

The longest running and most consistent platform for freeform, free spirited and experimental music in Israel. Curated by Eran Sachs and Alex “Drool” Yunowitch, Primate Arena has been active since 2008 and includes concerts, a radio program, an international festival, tours, panels and many additional activities, which have successfully raised the profile of experimental music in Israel and has nurtured a community of adventurous local musicians including Maya Dunietz and Yoni Silver, as well as hosted visiting internationals such as Blood Stereo, Dave Philips, Jérôme Noetinger, Fritz Welch, Arnaud Rivière, Ignatz Schick, Daniel Padden, Bob Ostertag and many others. Both Sachs and Yunowitch (as well as their guest musician Yoni Silver) are also members of Ensamblul Hyperion, dedicated to the works of Romanian Spectral composers Iancu Dumitrescu and Ana-Maria Avram.

Guests (RO)

Sillyconductor

Dyslex

Mihai Balabaș

Dan Michiu

Fierbințeanu

Programme

Sunday, 15th of September: 6pm – Romanian showcase (short sets) – @ National Center of Dance

Monday, 16th of September: 6pm – London, Tel Aviv, Bucharest: experimental music scenes, discussion with the programmers invited – @ Control Club

Thusday, 17th of September: 8pm – Concert Primate Arena and Paul Abbott – @ National Center of Dance

This initiative is possible through the support of British Council, CNDB and Control Club; big thanks to Florin Cojocaru for the sound.

Media partners: TATAIA, modernism.ro, metropotam.ro

Director of the festival: Octav Avramescu

Elena Apostol

Elena Apostol was born in Focsani, Romania. She studied composition at the University of  Music in Bucharest with Liviu Danceanu. In present she is a candidate for a doctor’s degree at UNMB, at Liviu Danceanu’s class.
She composed choral, chamber and orchestral music. Her works have been selected and performed at several music festivals. She is a member of The Union of Composers and Musicologists from Romania, SNR-SIMC and ARFA.

Website HERE

Dark Room Auditions @ InnerSound 2013

The Romanian Music Information Centre contributes to a project during InnerSound International New Arts Festival, a project that promotes Romanian electronic and electroacoustic music by placing it in an international context. Leave all your worries and prejudices behind, listen with your “eyes wide shut” and enter a magical world of mysterious sounds – such is the principle of Dark Room Auditions, a 5 hours installation that will be open daily between August 28th - August 31st, between 2 p.m. - 7 p.m. (free entrance during that period).

The project is realised in partnership with OPUS Association, the organizer of the festival, as well as Ephemair Association (Suzana Dan) that provided the location of the Dark Rooms: BlackBox (Piaţa Amzei nr.5, sector 1, Bucharest), the atelier that belongs to NAG („Noaptea Albă a Galeriilor” / „White Night of Galleries”).

The opening of Dark Room Auditions will take place on Tuesday, August 27th 2013, at 7 p.m.. The installation will run only partially on this particular occasion (1h30) and will be followed by Laurenţiu Darie’s bassoon recital at A1 Bar (Piata Amzei nr. 1, just two blocks away from Black Box).

Dark Room focuses on soundscapes, repetitive and hypnotic musics, various enough to include names from Romanian new music giants such as Octavian Nemescu or Călin Ioachimescu, to respected electronic music specialists such as Cătălin Creţu (OPUS President) or Adrian Borza and to the fascinating sound worlds of Sillyconductor (Cătălin Matei), Fluidian (Emil Gherasim) and Avânt’n’Gard.

The foreign part of Dark Room Auditions is equally eclectic and valuable: Henry Vega (Holland), Mattias Petterson (Sweden), Farang (Stefan Schmidt), the live code laptop quartet Benoît and the Mandelbrots & member composer Juan A. Romero (Germany). A special mention is due to Marcus Beuter (Germany), whose sound installation (faszination maschine – der mensch in der reflektion l) was created specially for InnerSound.

 

Dark Room Auditions

TIME SCHEDULE

 

14:00 – 14:30  – Part 1: Silly lovesongs

Sillyconductor / Romania

- Colour reading room (4:11 min)

Henry Vega / Holland (25:00):

- ONEderfull (5:40) tema festivalului

- Orbit Correction (5:31)

- A Thousand Tones (4:34)

- East of the Lake Mix (6:26)

- Piano Music 1 (2:43)

 

14:30 – 15:00 – Part 2: Meditation sketch

Farang (Stefan Schmidt) / Germany

– Ashqem – Sketches for processed classical guitar (30:00)

Classical guitar / Sound design /Composition: Stefan Schmidt (2012)

Mastering: Matthias Geiges

 

15:00 – 16:00 – Part 3: Birds, Soundscapes and Carols

15:00 Călin Ioachimescu / Romania

– Digital Birds (14:00)

15:14 Cătălin Creţu / Romania

– Lüneburg Soundscape (8:00 )

15:23 Adrian Borza / Romania

– Akedia (17:00)

Original title: Akedia for oboe,  nanoKontrol and iFPH (2011); Program:  iFPH (2011)

15:40 Fluidian (Emil Gherasim) / Romania (8:20)

- Inner Soundscapes (3:00)

- Soundpaintings (5:18)

15:48 Avânt’n’Gard / Romania – Non-tempered carols (12:00)

- Susu-n ‘naltul cerului (4:51)

- La sfarsitul lumii (7:09)

 

16:00-16:30 – Part 3: Into the Lake of Tears

Octavian Nemescu / Romania

– Lacul Lacrimilor (30:00)

 

16:30 – 17:10 – Part 4: Mechanisms

16:30 Benoît and the Mandelbrots / Germany (livecoding laptop band)

–Nadelrauschen (at Hochschule für Gestaltung (HfG) Karlsruhe, 14.12.2010 ) (23:30)

Juan A. Romero / Germany

– Drone (5:06)

17:00 Mattias Petersson / Sweden

– Darken your Veil (9:34) modular system

17:10 Marcus Beuter / Germany

- faszination maschine – der mensch in der reflektion l – Sound installation (80:00)

 

18:30 – 19:04 – Part 5: Coda

Sillyconductor / Romania

- Diorama (34:00)

 

Curator: Diana Rotaru (composer, Artistic Director of InnerSound and CIMRO coordinator)

 

For more information on the second edition of InnerSound International New Arts Festival, click HERE or visit the websiteFacebook page.

 

Eugen-Bogdan Popa

Cellist Eugen-Bogdan Popa was born in Iași, Romania, in 19 april 1980. He began music training at ”Octav Băncilă” Art Highschool in Iași, with prof.Eugenia-Liliana Baciu. He won first and second prizes at national performance contests (1994-1998). He attended several masterclasses held by prof. Marin Cazacu. He completed his studies – Bachelor, under the guidance of prof. Tiberiu Ungureanu, and Master degrees – at the National University of Music Bucharest. In 2010 he was awarded the title of Doctor at the National University of Music Bucharest, Thesis Title – ”Stylistic and performing aspects of the solo and chamber music for cello in the second half of the twentieth century”, scientific coordinator – prov.univ. dr. Nicolae Brânduș.

Since 2001, Eugen-Bogdan Popa works as cellist in the symphony orchestra of ”George Enescu” Philharmonic Bucharest. He also collaborated with the Chamber and Symphony Radio orchestras, with the ”Virtuozii” chamber orchestra, and participated as cellist in the musical part of some theatre and dramatic productions (Deceballo, Carmen`s Tragedy, The Journey of Orpheus). He is member of the ”ClavioArte” piano trio, of ”Noblesse” string quartet, of the ensembles  PROFIL,  PROPULS,  SonoMania  (contemporary music), ”Gli Studiosi di Sebastiano” (baroque music). Eugen-Bogdan Popa took part in CD recordings (Electrecord, Polish Institute in Bucharest, British Council), in TV and radio broadcasts/recordings (TVR Iaşi, Radio Iaşi, TVR 1, TVR Cultural, TV Trinitas). Since 2011 he has been associate professor with National University of Music Bucharest, teaching Cello and Orchestral studies (cello/double bass) classes.

Tudor Feraru

Romanian / Canadian composer of instrumental, orchestral, chamber, vocal, choral, film, and electroacoustic works, Tudor Feraru is currently Lecturer at the Cluj-Napoca Academy of Music. Tudor Feraru studied composition with Cornel Ţăranu and orchestral conducting with Petre Sbârcea at the “Gh. Dima”Academy of Music, where he earned his Bachelor of Music degree in both subjects in 2001. He also studied with Omar Daniel at the University of Western Ontario in Canada, where he earned a Master of Music degree in composition in 2003. Beginning in 2004, Tudor Feraru pursued Doctoral studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, under the supervision of Stephen Chatman. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in 2008. In 2012, he also completed Post-Doctoral research at the National University of Music in Bucharest.

Tudor Feraru has held teaching assistantships within the composition departments of the University of Western Ontario and the University of British Columbia. He has also instructed and conducted the contemporary music ensembles at these universities. Among his honors are scholarships from the “Sigismund Toduţă” Foundation, grants to attend composition masterclasses in Romania and the Czech Republic, full International Graduate Scholarships from the two Canadian universities, as well as several Prizes in national composition competitions in Romania.

Numerous of his original compositions have been performed, recorded and broadcast in Europe and North America. As a pianist, Tudor Feraru has performed in Romania and Canada, and has often played his own music. He has also occasionally served as an orchestral conductor.

Works by Tudor Feraru have been published by various editions, such as “Müller und Schade” in Bern – Switzerland, “VDM Verlag” in Saarbrücken – Germany, “Muşatinii” in Suceava – Romania, and “MediaMusica” in Cluj-Napoca.  Among his most notable recent compositions are the “Piano Concerto”, a chamber opera entitled “The Piano Teacher”, and the choreographic poem “The Lyre of Orpheus”.

Tudor Feraru is a member of the Romanian Society of Composers and Musicologists (UCMR).

MUSIC on internet: BaRoCh, Lira lui Orfeu/Orpheus’ Lyre